Bike Week brekkie

I went to the Bicycle Queensland / Scody Ride to Work event in King George Square earlier this month.

It was drizzling but I didn’t mind…

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Heaps of people turned up. My mate Tony won a bike light in the raffle. I was pleased with the free (healthy!) breakfast.

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Naturally there were some interesting bikes around. One guy had a compass on his handlebars:

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Must be fun to ride in a headwind. Or side-wind.

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Friday night was Film Night:

Where Are You Go:

And the last one was The Blue Bike (sorry, no embeddable trailer).

I won the tshirt for Tokyo to Osaka 🙂

A few dissections of order 18

A triangle dissection of an equilateral triangle is a way of dividing up a original triangle into smaller equilateral triangles, such that none of the smaller triangles overlap (for a few examples, scroll down in this post). Due to a known link between spherical latin bitrades and triangle dissections, we are able to enumerate triangle dissections exhaustively up to a certain size.

One way to calculate a canonical signature for each dissection is to take the list of triangles, the vertices of which live in mathbb{Q}(sqrt{3}) times mathbb{Q}(sqrt{3}), and take the sorted minimum sequence of sorted triples. We can write down a convenient representation (avoiding irrational numbers) by noting that elements of mathbb{Q}(sqrt{3}) have the form a + bmathbb{Q}(sqrt{3}) where a,,b in mathbb{Q}. For example, the first dissection shown below has the following signature:

0 0 0 0 1/1 2 0 0 1/12 1/6 0 0 0 1/12 0 0 1/12 1/6 0 0 0 1/4 0 0 1/12 1/12 0 0 1/12
1/6 0 0 1/6 1/4 0 0 1/12 1/6 0 0 0 1/4 0 0 1/12 1/3 0 0 0 1/6 0 0 1/6 1/4 0 0 1/12
1/3 0 0 1/6 1/6 0 0 1/6 1/4 0 0 1/4 1/3 0 0 1/6 1/4 0 0 1/12 1/3 0 0 0 5/12 0 0 1/12
1/4 0 0 1/12 5/12 0 0 1/4 7/12 0 0 1/12 1/4 0 0 1/4 1/3 0 0 1/6 5/12 0 0 1/4 1/4 0
0 1/4 1/3 0 0 1/3 5/12 0 0 1/4 1/3 0 0 0 5/12 0 0 1/12 1/2 0 0 0 1/3 0 0 1/3 1/2 0
0 1/6 2/3 0 0 1/3 1/3 0 0 1/3 1/2 0 0 1/2 2/3 0 0 1/3 5/12 0 0 1/12 1/2 0 0 0 7/12 0
0 1/12 1/2 0 0 0 7/12 0 0 1/12 2/3 0 0 0 1/2 0 0 1/6 2/3 0 0 0 5/6 0 0 1/6 1/2 0 0
1/6 2/3 0 0 1/3 5/6 0 0 1/6 2/3 0 0 0 5/6 0 0 1/6 1 0 0 0

(This signature can be converted to a PDF by echoing it as a single line to the Python script draw_dissection.py)

While double-checking my C++ implementation I found that my old Python code was finding 5 fewer dissections of order 18, when counting both separated and nonseparated dissections (separated dissections have interior vertices of degree 4, while nonseparated dissections have interior vertices of degree 4 or 6). It turned out to be the way that I was calculating a canonical signature. In the interest of saving space, my old Python code just stored a list of vertices, so naturally it lost information about whether a vertex was of degree 4 or 6. Surprisingly this caused no problems until order 18. The 5 pairs of vertex-equivalent dissections are shown below:

    

    

    

    

    

SciPy, _ZNSt8ios_base4InitD1Ev, and link flags

I recently tried to build SciPy 0.10.1 on a system with both the GNU and Intel compilers. Everything went find except that import scipy bombed out with:

ImportError: /opt/scipy/0.10.1/lib/python2.7/site-packages/scipy/
sparse/sparsetools/_csr.so: undefined symbol: _ZNSt8ios_base4InitD1Ev

The fix is to add “-lstdc++” to the link flags. I found a post on the SciPy mailing list where someone had the same problem and asked “Could someone please advise me how to ensure that the “-lstdc++” is successfully passed to the linker as and when I build scipy.”

The answer is to use the build_ext target to enable the link flag:

python setup.py config --compiler=intel --cc=icc --fcompiler=intelem build_ext -lstdc++
python setup.py config --compiler=intel --fcompiler=intelem install --prefix=/opt/scipy/0.10.1

Archived Comments

Date: 2012-07-26 11:00:02 UTC

Author: Charles

Thank you for this reposting. It was extremely useful (e.g. solved my problem)!